Fostering A Dog and Finding Love

Being married to a consultant and then choosing to travel with him is a never ending series of packing your bags and staying in hotels. I have found myself in hotels of all shapes and sizes in towns as small as Stroudsburg in USA and as big as Shanghai but I am not complaining. There have  been many adventurous along the way some minor and some life altering. One of those adventures was a tiny bundle called Bumbleshoot who was named after a music festival by the rescue center in North America.

We did not want to name him as he was going to be part of us only for a few weeks till he got adopted. But shouting Bumbleshoot every time he chewed my belt or got into my wardrobe in the hotel room was tiresome hence he was cagily named Chambu as he followed me dutifully from room to room. To rewind a little, we were living in a small city in Pennsylvanian called Conshohocken and were living in an extended stay hotel where we stayed for close to four months or more. It was around this time that I heard of Wags Rescue and the idea of fostering a dog got planted in my head. I had never owned a dog and my husband had not warmed up to the idea of being a dog lover.

Chambu - The first day he spent with us
Chambu – The first day he spent with us

We called up the rescue center and after they had contacted our referrals and had confirmed with our hotel Bumbleshoot came into our lives. Chambu as we later called him was a four month old black lab mix pup. He was part of a litter that the rescue center had saved from a Kill Shelter.  He came into our life and hotel room untrained much to the chagrin of the hotel’s housekeeping staff. The rescue center insisted that the pup be crate trained and hence gave us a crate and a few other essentials. The first night that the pup spent with us in the crate he howled all night while we Googled frantically and most sites advised us to leave him in the crate till he got used to it. Finally somewhere around 3 am we finally gave in and let him share our bed, where he happily snuggled.

The next day was spent in systematically crate training him and he learnt fast, his adopted family later told us that he was the recognized as the most well behaved dog at a training center they had taken him to . We then started the quest of potty training which took a little extra time and also teaching him to walk with a leash since most often he had his own agenda and would sometimes just plonk on the grassy patch near the hotel. Time moved fast and Chambu got adopted by a lovely family in the neighborhood. We had quite a lot of adventurous during his short stay with us like taking his to the vet when got an allergic reaction we were unable to diagnose (this was taken care of by the rescue center), making friends with fellow dog lovers, making a dog lover out of my husband, getting freaked out the first time he was taken near the river and many more.

He stayed with us for close to two months during which we learnt a lot from each other. The last day before his family picked him up was a very emotional day for me as we spent most of the day snuggling and going for a walk near the Schuylkill River. His family came that evening and he happily climbed into the car. We received a few pictures of him later as a strapping young dog and are quite happy that we let this little one come into our lives even if it was for a short duration.

Culture shocks for an Indian traveling to the US

America is a land of dreams and for some Indians it is their dream and only goal in life. The US has many great things to offer but as an individual coming from an entirely different culture there are many aspects about the culture that can strike a first time traveler. For me the distinct culture differences I percieved were not the short dresses (TV had sufficiently prepared me for this) or public display of affection that Indians usually assign as something western but in reality I have seen more PDA on a park bench in Nagpur than anywhere in the US.

A great guide for life in the America’s is a book called Inscrutable Americans that lists the maladies a naive Indian cooks up on his visit to the US. Some exchanges with ‘the natives’ in the US are embarrassing and awkward for example when trying to return a hug from an American friend (I am quite the non hugging type) which leads to several dives in the wrong direction and finally both parties settling for a handshake.

America is fun, interesting, dynamic and a place where many cultures merge. I have found more types of cuisines, cultures, races, ethnicity in this one country than any other country I have been to. Hence America is much more inclusive as it is said to be the land of immigrants. But America is not all roses and peaches there are negatives and positives like any other country and is guaranteed to have its share of culture shocks.

1. Public transport is very well connected in the cities but is very spotty in the suburbs. Hence getting from place A to B will require some intensive planning however short the distance if one does not own a car in the US or can’t drive (rented cars however are easy to hire). Calling a cab service is the other option but they are expensive.

2. Shops close by 8:30 pm and restaurants close pretty early too depending on which city you live in. The only happening area in a city after 8pm is downtown which is very different to cities (read metros) in India where one might get stuck in a traffic jam at 11pm.

3. Cheese burger is not a vegetarian burger with cheese. It is burger with beef patty most Americans can’t really comprehend a vegetarian burger save for some specialty restaurants, also waitresses who have experience with this faux pas will remind Indian customers and mention this repeatedly that there is beef in this burger!

4. People have dinner by 6pm and you might even get used to going to sleep by 9. In Mumbai 9 pm is Kaun Banega Crorepati (Indian version of Who wants to be a Millionaire) time.

5. America is not just its big cities but is made up of smaller towns too where life moves at its own pace. So if going to America is your life long dream, this is something you should keep in mind. America is not all big and bustling cities. It is smaller towns too were the only entertainment is a dinner theater in a diner and one street called Main street where everything happens.

6. If you cant drive or order online you might as well go back to India. America is all about driving and having a car so if you can’t drive and don’t live in a city you might soon get depressed enough to start packing but remember to save money for the cab service till the airport.

7. People smile at you and make small talk in elevators (that’s what Americans call a lift) all across America, so for someone who is new to this, keeping small talk ready for the next stranger becomes a task in itself. People smile and nod on the streets too.In India you can stare at the other person on the street till the person makes eye contact after which you look the other way and find someone else to stare at. But for all the friendliness it is still difficult to make friends in the US.

8. They have seen Indians before so you are not exotic and might not just find dates just because of your ethnicity. Even then you will find people who relate India to bindi (dot), sarees, hot, curry, yoga and Bollywood only.

9. In the U.S people are very particular about safety, so no dangling from bus doors and riding on the foot board of a train. Your days of adventure on the commute are over.People in the US need a firework permit to light fireworks for festivals.

10. The sky is so BIG in the U.S!! The horizon in the US seems vast and is a startling difference in for someone who has lived near the equator all her life.

11. Driving in the US with its serpentine interstates and automatic vehicles is boring for a person who learned to drive in India as there are no cows to dodge, no rickshaws to honk at and knowing traffic rules in not optional.

12. 50% of the commercials on TV are for prescription drugs and they are required to list the side effects (includes death) which takes up half the ad and usually has a video of a dog and his master playing. Though Indians are not used to see ads for drugs we can easily buy them over the counter with or without prescription which is not allowed in the US.

13. Getting a Doctors appointment in some cities in the US is next to impossible. We tried for a Doctors appointment in Pennsylvania but most were booked for more than 3 months for new patients. Finally we ended up traveling to the next state where we got an opening for an appointment. The inference is that access to medical attention seems to be similar in India as well as the US for entirely different reasons.

14. Guns are an important part of American culture hence owning a gun is common place and so are news articles of a lone gun man shooting someone or ‘some’ people.

15. Winter and snow can get very depressing after the initial novelty wears of as the sky looks grey and the earth turns white but spring and autumn are an entirely different story all together as it becomes a riot of colors.

16. Portion sizes are HUGE! The first time I ordered a Pepsi I felt I had to be extra careful with the cup least someone drowns in it? Another time I ordered a pork chop at a diner and got a chunk of meat as big as my thigh, I considered taking a cue from tigers and burying the meat and eating it for an entire month.

17. In India trains are the cheapest and most reliable mode of transport and one can scale the entire country traveling only in trains. This is not the case in the United States, trains can be expensive sometimes more expensive than flights. Also trains have limited sleeping coaches/berths and most of the train would have sitting option only.

18. Healthcare, even basic healthcare is costly for people without insurance (Obamacare might make some difference to this). Free or charitable programs are very few hence poor people face a number of problems to avail healthcare options. Some enroll themselves in drug trials to get a shot at medical care. Emergency care though is mandatory and free for all residents in the US.

19. Yes, there are homeless people and poor people in the US too, though lesser in number compared to India. I got to work and interact with some people at a rehabilitation center where I volunteered. It was a very enriching experience and it gave me an added perspective of the US and some underlying problems which is not all glitz and glamour.

20. The US is one of the only 4 countries along with Papa new Guinea where maternity leave is not mandatory given to women. This along with having to wax legs at home because beauty parlors are expensive are just some of the problems women face in the US.

I had a great time traveling in the US and I was lucky to see many parts of this amazing country. Some of this is written as an attempt at wry humor and some of it is of course true. Anyone traveling to a new culture is bound to have some culture shocks whether it is Indians visiting the US or Americans visiting India. If you have some of your experiences to add, please do so in the comments. I also believe that such culture shocks are what make travelling to a new country exciting.

The City Named after Garlic – Chicago

Chicago is known for its chilly winds and deep dish pizza but no one quite prepared me for the astonishing architecture of the city. Chicago is a photographers delight with its rivers, tall buildings and the wide expanse that is Lake Michigan.

We visited Chicago during autumn when the leaves were golden and the air had a fine nip in it. The city was a hive of activity and adventure. The restaurants, theaters, cruises and parks formed only the tip of the entertainment and activities the city had to offer. One of our most memorable tour in Chicago was the architecture boat cruise. We had our doubts before embarking on the tour as the name sounded pretty dry and we wanted more encouragement for looking at buildings in the cold winter air.

The architecture tour was a pleasant surprise as it dwelled on the past, the making and the present of the city of Chicago. They even provided great tid bits of knowledge on the Great fire of Chicago and origins of the name Chicago. The word Chicago has its origins in Native American languages and means either an onion or garlic (I have found sources saying either or) but for a city that is named after a smelly root Chicago was an amazing city to travel and explore.

Here are the sights and sounds of Chicago through our lens.

The city connected by bridges
A city connected by bridges
Each building has a unique story
Each building has a unique story
Some heights achieved by architecture
Some heights achieved by architecture
Columbus Drive
Columbus Drive
A Glimpse of the Chicago marathon
A Glimpse of the Chicago marathon (need a better zoom lens)
The iconic Bean
The iconic Bean
The Bean from a different point of view
The Bean from a different point of view
A Sparrow fattening up for the winter
A Sparrow fattening up for the winter
An O
An O. I am sure it means something in modern art
A Boat Cruising on the river
A Boat Cruising on the river
The Pier
The Pier
The boats docked on the pier waiting for the lake to freeze
The boats docked on the pier waiting for the winter
The giant wheel at Navy Pier
The giant wheel at Navy Pier
One should always know which direction home is
One should always know which direction home is ?
Navy Pier
Navy Pier
The Windy city
The Windy city

Pictures credited to Razor Rasu and are a property of Traveling Noodles

The City That Gave Us Love

Philadelphia is a very special city for us for many reasons. We fell in love with Philadelphia the moment we laid eyes on her. The city of Philadelphia is a tourists delight and the pride of any one who calls the city their own, however briefly. Philadelphia was the first capital of USA and it was the city where thinkers like Benjamin Franklin walked on the same cobbled stone streets as found today. It was the stage of the American Independence and has many stories to tell from that era. The city saw many first’s such as the first telephone, the first elevator (lift) and many other innovative inventions of time immemorial.

If anyone wants to get a feel of the city all you have to do is play the original game of Monopoly, you will find Reading Terminal, Water Works,Park place and all the other Monopoly squares come alive in Philadelphia. The game was designed based on the city of Philadelphia. The city gives the feeling of being a compact city with the roads criss crossing to form perfect squares while being deceivingly big. The city has maintained the same characteristics and flavors from the day William Penn planned the city.

Philadelphia is a mix of historical and modern surprises at every corner. Every road and every nook between the Delaware and the Schuylkill rivers has a brilliant story to tell, giving the city so much in terms of character. The city has something to offer to every type of person with the Rocky statue for the movie buffs, Reading Terminal and Philly cheese steak for the foodies, Eastern State Penitentiary for the history seeker, free libraries and museums for the seeker of literature and art and Fairmount Park for the nature lover. The center of the city has the symbol of Love which has become a universal icon for Love. Here is my ode to the city of Philadelphia in photographs.

The City that gave us Love
The City that gave us Love
Reading Terminal station which is now a famous but authentic food court
Reading Terminal station which is now a famous but authentic food court
Boat House Row one of the most Romantic parts of the city
Boat House Row one of the most Romantic parts of the city
Eastern State Penitentiary  and its chilling past
Eastern State Penitentiary and its chilling past
Remember Water Works in Monopoly ? Here it is
Remember Water Works in Monopoly ? Here it is
Door way to Ben Franklin's House
Door way to Ben Franklin’s House
A Frozen Lake
A Frozen Lake
A rusted Door at the Penintantary
A rusted Door at the Penintantary

Photographs credited to Razor Rasu